Moreover

Moth larvae


Moth larvae


Lepidoptera, commonly known as butterflies, include over 100,000 species spread throughout the world but especially in tropical regions. In the Lepidoptera the form harmful to agriculture and foodstuffs is represented by the larva. Crops damage is caused by larvae that have a well-developed chewing mouthparts; some species are voracious leaf strippers. The larvae of certain species feed on fruits, others dig tunnels in the leaves (Lepidoptera miners), others still dig tunnels in the wood of the trunks and branches (Lepidoptera xylophagous). The former have small dimensions and cause minor damage to the plants, although in general the affected parts turn yellow and fall, therefore the damage is predominantly aesthetic. The xylophagous, on the other hand, have a rather slow development, during which however the plants perish and the branches can easily break. In the most serious cases it is also possible to dry up most of the foliage. To combat these insects it is advisable to eliminate the infested shoots before the flicker of the adults and to intervene during the laying of the eggs with special products. It is also useful to use pheromone traps for population control. The biological control of defoliation larvae can be performed through the use of natural pyrethrum applied diluted in water with sprayer pumps. For the death of other types of larvae of moth the bacillus thun'ngr'ensis can be used as a fight, which when combined with water is sprayed onto the foliage with simple sprayers.